Shatter Me: When the Store-Brand is Better than the Real Thing

By Jen P

A few years ago, I reviewed a book called Rogue Touch. I liked the book just fine, but it strayed so heavily from the source material, it rubbed a lot of Rogue fans the wrong way. Recently, I found the time to try Shatter Me, by Tahereh Mafi. It’s been in my TBR for so long, I forgot it was there. But I’m glad I found it again. The main character isn’t actually Rogue, and the world isn’t that of the X-Men, but it may as well be both. Read on to find out how. Continue reading

American Gods: A Double Review

by T. Mack

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American Gods is a book by Neil Gaiman, first published in 2001. It is also a television series based on the book which aires on the STARZ network. Both iterations tell the story of Shadow Moon, a felon who is released three days early from prison due to a family tragedy. On the way to the funeral, Shadow meets Mr. Wednesday, who offers him a job as a chauffeur, valet, and overall manservant. This encounter sets in motion events in Shadow’s life that are amazing, devastating, tragic, and triumphant. It sends him on a journey of discovery, whether he wants to go or not. In the end, Shadow could end up a hero, a martyr, back in jail, or the King of America.

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Double Dose of Social Commentary: A Review of Dietland (the book & the show)

by T. Mack

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AMC just finished airing the first season of its show, Dietland. The series is based on a book of the same name by Sarai Walker. Both the book and the series follow mostly the same plot and focus on the same basic themes: self-acceptance, facing inequality and rape culture in our society, and the notion that women have much more power than they give themselves credit for. While the show and book both have some tough parts to get through — TRIGGER WARNINGS for those who, like me, are sensitive to descriptions and depictions of rape in literature, television, and movies — they do provide what I believe to be a much-needed commentary on our current culture’s obsession with a particular standard of beauty and the double-standard of expectations for men and women.

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